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August 2015

 

Monday, 31 August 2015

One of my car club buddies has started having water problems. Five of us went over to his house to help him pull the pump out of his well. That would have involved pulling 200 feet of flexible plastic pipe, as well as the pump itself and it's why there were five of us there.

We got the end of the pipe off of the pitless adapter and propped it on the top of the well sleeve. We then turned on the pump and the pump is pumping just fine. That meant that his problem is not with the well itself, but somewhere between the well and the house. Once we determined he did not need to pull the pump, we mostly left.

He found his problem and it was a huge leak underneath his house. That is much easier to fix than to use a backhoe to uncover the pipe buried 5 feet down between the well and the house, so he basically lucked out. And we were glad to help him localize the problem.


Silly sign of the day:


Free/Open Source Software


Security Theater/"Intellectual Property"

Monday, 24 August 2015

I will be teaching a class in how to create cabochons next month. I presented this idea at last week's mineral club meeting and it was very well received. There are at least 12 people who want to learn, so I and at least two other members will be busy teaching them on September 13. We won't have room for all of them, so we will have to arrange another day for those who are turned away from the first date.


I am polishing up my teardrop and Plymouth in preparation to going to a memorial service this afternoon for Gary Haymond, a Phuddy Duddy Cruisers member who passed away last week. After the memorial we will cruise over to the Paul Bunyon's in Hayden for our normal Monday cruise-in.


Silly sign of the day:


Free/Open Source Software


Security Theater/"Intellectual Property"

Tuesday, 18 August 2015

I have finished replacing the door on my teardrop trailer. The only part of the replacement where I needed help is using contact cement to reattach the aluminum skin back on the outside of the new door.

Here is what the old door looked like from the inside of the trailer and without all the aluminum parts.

Note the water damage. It occurs when I drive through rainstorms. I hope to fix that problem with a couple of aluminum channels that will direct the water away from the door.

Here is the replacement door, with all the aluminum parts mounted.

The new door is now installed and fits correctly. The only thing left to do on it is to attach the drape on the inside.

I still have a couple of things to do to the trailer, but it should be ready for the two car shows where I will be using and showing it.


Silly sign of the day:


Free/Open Source Software


Security Theater/"Intellectual Property"

Friday, 14 August 2015

This weekend there is no car show I am interested in going to, but there is an event. A Taste of Rathdrum is being held on Saturday at Rathdrum's Majestic Park. The Phuddy Duddy Cruisers have been invited to display their cars, and I will take my '52 Plymouth to that event.

I will also be working on removing the aluminum covering on the teardrop trailer door I am replacing. It is partially separated and I will use acetone on it to loosen up the rest. I can then cut out the new door and put it all back together. I need the trailer for two car shows next month.


Here's some handy facts: Microsoft Windows 10 is a free download for anyone with an earlier version of Windows. BUT: if you have trouble with installing Windows 10 (many, many people do), you can get Internet support from Microsoft. It will cost you $149 for six months support or $199 for 2 years. They also require you to pay for using their DVD player. So Windows 10 can actually cost you more than earlier upgrades where you paid up front.

One of my classic car buddies was complaining to me on Saturday at Hauser Daze about this. I have persuaded him to try Linux and I gave him a DVD of Linux Mint 17.2 on Monday night. We'll see how he likes it. In the meantime, he had to back out of Windows 10, back to Windows 8, which he didn't like in the first place.


Silly sign of the day:


Free/Open Source Software


Security Theater/"Intellectual Property"

Monday, 10 August 2015

I have removed the water-damaged door from my teardrop trailer. I now have to separate the aluminum skin from that door so I can use it on a new door. I have the birch plywood for a new door.

The aluminum skin was bonded to the plywood door with contact cement, and in the past 12 years, they have separated very little. Removing the skin and cleaning it up will be a big job.


Asking in the old Plymouth forums for a picture of the Concord nameplate paid off. Someone there searched eBay for "Concord script" and found this:

As you can see, the actual part is corroded and it isn't worth what they are asking for it. However, I think I can get the people at the KTEC center here to create a plastic 3-D part from the large version of this picture. Once I have that, we can either plate the plastic or create a metal part from it.


Silly sign of the day:


Free/Open Source Software


Security Theater/"Intellectual Property"

Wednesday, 5 August 2015

I am in the process of tuning up an article I wrote about doing rapid application development with Lazarus, and I will submit it to Linux Voice magazine as soon as I finish. I'm not sure if they will be interested, but there is a distinct lack of articles on the subject on the Internet.


For four years, I have been looking for a piece of chrome for my 1952 Plymouth Concord. It is the Concord nameplate that is mounted on the front fenders. I have been unsuccessful in finding the chrome piece, so I decided I could print one from a picture. The problem with that is I can't find a good picture of the piece. This is the closest I have come:

You obviously cannot create a physical part from that fuzzy picture. I am still looking and have posted an inquiry on the Old Plymouth Forum.


I created another YouTube video using my gdvdslides program. You can see the results below. I have found some bugs in gdvdslides and will fix them, so you can expect a new version in the near future.

gdvdslides uses dvd-slideshow, which in turn uses ffmpeg. If you are interested, you might want to read the article below about ffmpeg and forking.


Silly sign of the day:


Free/Open Source Software


Security Theater/"Intellectual Property"